Monday, March 19, 2012

If You Like the Hunger Games…

It appears that vampire romance novels are out and gloomy outlooks on future societies are in, especially since Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games Trilogy is all the buzz!  The much anticipated film hits theaters on Friday, March 23, 2012, so be prepared and check out the series.  If you can’t get a copy to read or you have already read the series then take a chance with one of these dystopian novels:

Feed by M.T. Anderson
In a future where most people have computer implants in their heads to control their environment, a boy meets an unusual girl who is in serious trouble.

The Roar by Emma Clayton
In an overpopulated world where all signs of nature have been obliterated and a wall has been erected to keep out plague-ridden animals, 12 year-old Mika refuses to believe that his twin sister was killed after being abducted, and continues to search for her in spite of the dangers he faces in doing so.

Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer
14 year-old Cosmo Hill escapes from his abusive orphanage and teams up with three other people who share his unusual ability to see supernatural creatures, and together they determine the nature and purpose of the swarming blue Parasites that are invisible to most humans.

Matched by Ally Condie
Cassia has always had complete trust in the Society to make decisions for her, but when she is being paired with her ideal mate, a second face flashes on the screen, and Cassia begins to doubt the Society's infallibility as she tries to decide which man she truly loves.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds himself if he is to escape.

House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer
In a future where humans despise clones, Matt enjoys special status as the young clone of El Patrón, the 142 year-old leader of a corrupt drug empire nestled between Mexico and the United States.

Rash by Pete Hautman
In a future society that has decided it would "rather be safe than free," 16 year-old Bo's anger control problems land him in a tundra jail where he survives with the help of his running skills and an artificial intelligence program named Bork.

XVI by Julia Karr
In 2150 Chicago, girls are walking billboards. Upon turning 16, they receive government-issued tattoos on their wrists that read “XVI.” They’re supposed to keep the girls safe, but in reality, the tattoos broadcast their brand-new sexual availability.

The Secret Under My Skin by Janet McNaughton
In the year 2368, humans exist under dire environmental conditions and one young woman, rescued from a workcamp and chosen for a special duty, uses her love of learning to discover the truth about the planet's future and her own dark past.

Birthmarked by Caragh O’Brien
In a future world baked dry by the sun and divided into those who live inside the wall and those who live outside it, 16 year-old midwife Gaia Stone is forced into a difficult choice when her parents are arrested and taken into the city.

Delirium by Lauren Oliver
Lena looks forward to receiving the government-mandated cure that prevents the delirium of love and leads to a safe, predictable, and happy life, until ninety-five days before her eighteenth birthday and her treatment, when she falls in love.

Divergent by Veronica Roth
In a future Chicago, 16 year-old Beatrice Prior must choose among five predetermined factions to define her identity for the rest of her life, a decision made more difficult when she discovers that she is an anomaly who does not fit into any one group, and that the society she lives in is not perfect after all.

Unwind by Neal Shusterman
In a future world where those between the ages of 13-18 can have their lives "unwound" and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs--and, perhaps, save their own lives.

All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin
In a dystopian future where chocolate and caffeine are contraband, teenage cellphone use is illegal, and water and paper are carefully rationed, Anya Balanchine finds herself thrust unwillingly into the spotlight as heir apparent to an important New York City crime family.

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